What You Need to Know About Meningococcal Meningitis

Some background info

Meningitis is a type of invasive meningococcal disease. It's a bacterial infection that can attack the brain and spinal cord.1

There are 5 common forms of the bacteria that cause meningococcal disease in the United States: A, C, Y, W, and B.2

 

Until 2014, there was no vaccine to help protect against meningitis B in the United States. Now there are vaccines for groups A, C, Y, and W, and for group B. Talk to your healthcare provider about getting protected.2,3

Death within 24 hours

Early symptoms of meningococcal disease can be misinterpreted as the flu, but can lead to death within 24 hours.5,6

Long-term impact

More important for those who survive, it can cause permanent disabilities.7

Learn about a vaccine that can help protect against MenB

Learn More

References: 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meningococcal disease: signs and symptoms: meningococcal meningitis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/about/symptoms.html. Updated April 1, 2014. Accessed May 24, 2016. 2. MacNeil JR, Rubin L, Folaranmi T, et al. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Use of Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccines in Adolescents and Young Adults: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. MMWR. 2015;64(41):1171-1177. 3. Folaranmi T, Rubin L, Martin SW, et al. Use of serogroup B meningococcal vaccines in persons aged ≥10 years at increased risk for serogroup B meningococcal disease: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2015. MMWR. 2015;64(22):608-612. 4. MacNeil J. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epidemiology of serogroup B meningococcal disease, United States. Slide presentation presented at: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Atlanta, GA; October 30, 2014. 5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meningococcal disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/index.html. Updated March 4, 2016. Accessed May 24, 2016. 6. Thompson MJ, Ninis N, Perera R, et al. Clinical recognition of meningococcal disease in children and adolescents. Lancet. 2006;367(9508):397-403. 7. Bettinger JA, Scheifele DW, Le Saux N, et al. The disease burden of invasive meningococcal disease in Canada. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(1):e20-e25.