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Common transmission behaviors

Typical adolescent and young adult behaviors, such as close-quartered living, sharing drinks or utensils, and kissing, can spread the bacteria that cause meningitis B (MenB).1

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References

  • 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meningococcal disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/index.html. Updated January 21, 2020. Accessed June 29, 2020.
  • 2. Christensen H, May M, Bowen L, et al. Meningococcal carriage by age: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Infect Dis. 2010;10(12):853-861.
  • 3. National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. Addressing the challenges of serogroup B meningococcal disease outbreaks on campuses: a report by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. https://www.nfid.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/meningococcal-b-report.pdf. Published May 2014. Accessed March 11, 2020.
  • 4. Cohn AC, MacNeil JR, Harrison LH, et al. Changes in Neisseria meningitidis disease epidemiology in the United States, 1998-2007: implications for prevention of meningococcal disease. Clin Infect Dis. 2010;50(2):184-191.
  • 5. Bettinger JA, Scheifele DW, Le Saux N, et al. The disease burden of invasive meningococcal serogroup B disease in Canada. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(1):e20-e25.
  • 6. Thompson MJ, Ninis N, Perera R, et al. Clinical recognition of meningococcal disease in children and adolescents. Lancet. 2006;367(9508):397-403.
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