What You Need to Know

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Learn about a vaccine
that can help protect
against MenB

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Learn about a vaccine
that can help protect
against MenB

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References

  • 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meningococcal disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/index.html. Updated January 21, 2020. Accessed June 29, 2020.
  • 2. McNeil LK, Zagursky RJ, Lin SL, et al. Role of factor H binding protein in Neisseria meningitidis virulence and its potential as a vaccine candidate to broadly protect against meningococcal disease. Microbiol Mol Biol Rev. 2013;77(2):234-252.
  • 3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommended child and adolescent immunization schedule for ages 18 years or younger: United States, 2020. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/child/0-18yrs-child-combined-schedule.pdf. Updated January 29, 2020. Accessed March 10, 2020.
  • 4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance report, 2018. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/downloads/NCIRD-EMS-Report-2018.pdf. Accessed June 23, 2020.
  • 5. Soeters HM, McNamara LA, Blain AE, et al. University-based outbreaks of meningococcal disease caused by serogroup B, United States, 2013-2018. Emerg Infect Dis. 2019;25(3):434-440.
  • 6. Thompson MJ, Ninis N, Perera R, et al. Clinical recognition of meningococcal disease in children and adolescents. Lancet. 2006;367(9508):397-403.
  • 7. Bettinger JA, Scheifele DW, Le Saux N, et al. The disease burden of invasive meningococcal serogroup B disease in Canada. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(1):e20-e25.
  • 8. Borg J, Christie D, Coen PG, et al. Outcomes of meningococcal disease in adolescence; prospective, matched-cohort study. Pediatrics. 2009;123(3):e502-e509.
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