KNOW THE FACTS

Common transmission behaviors

Meningitis B is contracted through contact with someone's saliva. This leaves teens and young adults at increased risk through common behaviors like kissing, close-quarter living, and sharing beverages and cosmetics.1,8

Regarding inequities and mistrust in healthcare

There’s a long history of inequities that have broken the trust between black communities and healthcare systems. Even now, only 12% of black parents know about MenB vaccines, compared to 60% of white parents.*7 But we know absolutely that vaccines save lives. And we want everyone to understand the urgency of vaccinating their child against meningitis B—which is rare but can lead to serious illness, and in some cases even death, within 24 hours after the onset of symptoms.6

*Survey of parents and guardians, corresponding to 26,266,700 members of the US population (after weighting).

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References

  • 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meningococcal disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/index.html. Updated January 21, 2020. Accessed June 29, 2020.
  • 2. Christensen H, May M, Bowen L, et al. Meningococcal carriage by age: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Infect Dis. 2010;10(12):853-861.
  • 3. National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. Addressing the challenges of serogroup B meningococcal disease outbreaks on campuses: a report by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. https://www.nfid.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/meningococcal-b-report.pdf. Published May 2014. Accessed March 11, 2020.
  • 4. Cohn AC, MacNeil JR, Harrison LH, et al. Changes in Neisseria meningitidis disease epidemiology in the United States, 1998-2007: implications for prevention of meningococcal disease. Clin Infect Dis. 2010;50(2):184-191.
  • 5. Bettinger JA, Scheifele DW, Le Saux N, et al. The disease burden of invasive meningococcal serogroup B disease in Canada. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(1):e20-e25.
  • 6. Thompson MJ, Ninis N, Perera R, et al. Clinical recognition of meningococcal disease in children and adolescents. Lancet. 2006;367(9508):397-403.
  • 7. Srivastava A, Dempsey A, Galitsky A, et al. Parental awareness and utilization of meningococcal serogroup B vaccines in the United States. BMC Public Health. 2020;20(1):1109.
  • 8. Rhode Island Department of Health. Frequently asked questions about meningitis and the cases at Providence College. https://health-center.providence.edu/files/2018/02/health-faqs.pdf. Published February 5, 2015. Accessed August 26, 2021.
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